The tree of life: this mythical symbol

 

The tree of life is a powerful and ancient symbol, present in many cultures.

 

It is the symbolic connection between all the forms of creation, like an immense genealogical tree. It is often represented in a circle.

 

The tree of knowledge connects the underground world, represented by the roots, with the heavenly world, represented by the branches.

 

The tree is a symbol present in many religions, mythologies and philosophies.

 

According to Christianity, the tree is present in the garden of Eden, it is the symbol of eternal life and the knowledge of good and evil.

 

The same notion of an immortal tree is found in Islam and in Judaism. Placed in the middle of Paradise, it loses its leaves every winter and these grow back in the following spring (representation of the eternal cycle of seasons and life).

 

According to Buddhism, ‘Açvattha’ is a sacred fig tree: it is under this tree that Buddha meditated and acquired wisdom.

 

Among the Hindus, the universe takes the form of an overturned tree: it’s roots start from the sky, and its branches and leaves cover the earth. The sacred tree of Hindus is the Akshayavat, “the eternal banyan,” a remarkable example of divine power, for this tree would be indestructible. It would be located within the ramparts of Fort Allahabad, at the confluence of the Ganges and the Yamuna River.

 

In Chinese mythology, ‘Kien-mou’ is the sacred tree that connects the nine sources (stay of the dead) to the nine heavens. Thanks to him, the sovereigns pass from heaven to earth and vice versa. They are temporary substitutes for the sun to manage life on earth.

 

The tree of life, a mythical symbol, is considered a lucky charm, a talisman that reminds us of where we come from and where we go (we come from Earth to rise to the Heavens).

 

The flower of life, will be the subject of an upcoming article 🙂

 

The tree is charged with symbolism and imbued with divine essence, and with the spark of life that allows it to grow.

 

It is a very recurrent symbol on jewelry, and ARASIA-SHOP hangings for its spiritual aspect, but it is also because very aesthetic.

 

We offer many products wonderfully decorated with trees of life like draperies, pendants, etc …

 

Read our blog article about the Banyans  here .

 

Plant a tree with Arasia and Mass-Education.

 

Mass-Education planted 100,000 trees in Bengal

 

All our reforestation actions

 

Thanks to Stéphanie, a trainee who provided the basis for this article

 

The banyan trees: sacred trees

The banyan, also called pagoda fig tree, Bo tree, pipal, or ficus religiosa is a majestic tree that can reach 30 meters, and several hundred meters in circumference!

With its aerial roots descending from its bushy crown to the ground, becoming trunks, and its heart-shaped leaves, the banyan invites to meditation. In Asia, they are found everywhere: in the towns, in the middle of a road, in front of a building or in the middle of a parking lot, and are tended to by devotees who come to place some offerings or prayers.

Indeed, it is said that Buddha attained enlightenment under the shadow of a banyan tree. And the Bhagavad-Gita made it the tree of supreme knowledge.

This tree has a particular energy, the banyan trees are very often found near the temples, and can live up to 1500 years. It has the power to calm the mind, but also to take the mind very high to heaven.

In South America it is called “the tree that walks” because it seems to have enormous legs that can be compared to elephant’s that leave the “main trunk”.

Some famous banyan trees:

The most famous and most sacred is in the holy city of Bodh-Gaya, in northeastern India, where the Buddha would have attained enlightenment.

The Great Banian of Howrah, near Calcutta, India. Its diameter is over 130 meters.

Another famous Banyan is the Dodda Alada Mara in Bangalore.

The banyan is part of many Ayurvedic remedies. One uses its sap, its leaves, or its bark.

 

Operation 1 euro = 1 tree in Bengal!

 

Arasia’s reforestation

Forest Man, the man who planted a forest!

Majuli Island is located in the Bhramaputra River in the north of India. In the 1970s it was a large shoal threatened by winds and soil erosion with a population of 150,000 inhabitants.

Jadav Payeng is an incredible defender of nature. Since 1979, tree by tree, he planted, by himself an incredible forest, the Molai forest, with the aim of saving his island threatened by erosion.

Forest Man Jadav Payeng

Today, the Molai Forest makes up to more than 550 hectares. It has become dense and rich, and is home to many animal and plant, many of which are endangered: elephants, Bengal tigers, one-horned rhinoceros, vultures …

The Molai forest was planted by a single man, now dubbed “Forest Man”, he planted his forest without tools or without any help but simply with his two bare hands.

Jadav Payeng devoted his life to planting this forest, this man is a true nature lover, humble and passionate, who shows us that with will anything is possible.

His fight is far from over. As he himself says: “it will never be. The biggest threat I face is not from nature but from my people. Man has a vocation to destroy everything, when it should be the opposite. I will fight to the end to make it happen. ”

What if we took this as an example and each of us take action on their own scale? The whole world would be transformed.

Arasia offers you the opportunity to plant trees by participating in the operation 1 euro = 1 tree, in partnership with the Indian NGO Mass-Education.

Click here to plant a tree!

Learn more about reforestation projects sponsored by Arasia here.

Reforestation in Sumatra

Glances, expressions, gestures … The behavior of the last great ape in Asia could not be more disturbing … In Malay , orangutan means “man of the forest” the beast shares 96.4% of its DNA with humans.

Yet, massive deforestation is currently taking place in these paradise islands of Borneo and Sumatra, mainly to plant oil palm tree – palm oil is produced at very low prices and is increasingly used in the food, cosmetics and chemical industries, and for the manufacture of biofuels.

Highly dependent on forests, not only orangutans are endangered: the forests’extraordinary biodiversity as well. Indonesia knows the world’s fastest deforestation (the equivalent of a football field every 10 seconds).

Forest destruction threatens the balance of our planet.

Arasia, in partnership with Sumatran Orangoutan Society, attempts to raise awareness on this issue, and sells a range of T-shirts and tank tops directly supporting this cause.

 

Achievement in Indonesia!

Take action!

Arasia also sponsored the planting of 800 trees in the park of GunungLeuser in Sumatra.

 

A tree is worth more than its wood

A tree is a treasure that provides shading, moisture, fruits and fresh air.
A tree is a home to birds, insects and monkeys, the forests are the lungs of the earth.

In yoga, tree posture is excellent to soothe, harmonize and balance the body and mind.

Unfortunately deforestation is raging all around the globe…
Wild animals flee at the sound of chainsaws which destroys the ecosystems and replacing them with monocultures that deprive people of their traditional natural resources.
A destroyed forest can no longer regulate drought and moisture, and tree roots can no longer hold the soil during storms, landslides, and climate change …
We shall remain positive anyway and plant trees!

More and more activities are carried out locally and globally to fight against environmental destruction.

Every single one of us can act at their own scale and broadcast the message.

Plant a tree for one euro in India with Arasia and Mass Education!
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Other Uses of Soap Nuts

Concoction of soap nuts:

Boil 1 liter of water with 10 or 20 soap nuts for 5 to 10 minutes, let cool for a few hours, and filter. Keep it in a cool ambiance for several days.
It is optional to add a preservative (lemon, tea tree essential oil or grapefruit seed extract)

You can use this concoction as a no foam shampoo : your hair will be shiny and easier to style!

You can use this concoction as a natural mild soap to wash your animals (dog, horse).

A highly concentrated concoction will give you a natural form of soap which is regenerating and non-aggressive, and that you can use to hand wash your clothes or your body.

You can use it as a universal cleaner due to its purifying and disinfecting properties.

You can use also use it to protect your plants, to moisten and water your plants. Your garden will thank you!

The fruit core is often used in the manufacture of handcrafted jewelry.

The Sapindus mukorossi is traditionally used in Ayurvedic medicine to cure skin diseases.

You can find more information and buy soap nuts on my online shop Arasia.

ldd soapnuts